Tag: bacterial degradation

Recent Articles-IJES

Impact of Deltamethrin on Environment, use as an Insecticide and its Bacterial degradation – A preliminary study
Author(s) – Shrivastava Bhanu et al.,

ABSTRACT

Deltamethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid pesticidethat kills insects through dermal contact and digestion. It is applied for a range of commercial crops and recreational uses, and by extension controls a variety of pests. The cytological effects of deltamethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid used as an insecticide, have been studied using root meristems of Allium cepa. Deltamethrin treatment resulted in a dose-related reduction in mitotic index. Both chromosomal and mitotic abnormalities were encountered at all concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2 ppm. Most of the chromosomal and mitotic abnormalities were apparently due to disturbance in the mitotic spindle. Induction of chromosome and chromatid breaks with higher concentrations (0.5 to 2.0 ppm) suggested clastogenic action of this compound but Deltamethrin is not mobile in the environment because of its strong adsorption on particles, its insolubility in water, and very low rates of application; however, it still presents risks to the ecosystem in which it is applied. The level of deltamethrin biodegradation in mixed cultures of benthic and planktonic bacteria after 5, 10, and 15 days of incubation was higher than that in homogenous cultures. It was demonstrated that microorganisms from the Sphingomonas paucimobilis species and the Moraxella genus, among planktonic bacteria, as well as Burkholderia cepacia and Bacillus mycoides species, among benthic bacteria, were the most effective in reducing the concentration of this insecticide

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Recent Articles-IJES-Study on Proteolytic Treatment of Textile Fabric Softness and Smoothening using Halophilic Bacterial Biopolymers

ABSTRACT

In this study, we have carried out the course of study on proteolytic treatment of fabric surface cotton based on Halophilic bacterial biopolymers. The halophilic bacteria Vibrio harveyi, Halomonas sp, Vibrio fluvialis, and Halobacterium sp., strains were isolated from soil samples collected from Pichavaram Mangrove forest, India. The crude extract of the biopolymers were separated from the cell free supernatant using the 95% cold ethanol and dialyzed. This biopolymer were studied soluble in water and insoluble in any organic solvents tested; gelation occurred under alkaline conditions in the presence of divalent cations in which as CuSo4 gave the best result, including stabilizing effects on oil-water emulsions with a variety of vegetable oils as well as flocculating effects against activated carbon powder after 5min and the highest flocculating activity was observed in biopolymer no-2. However, biopolymer no-1, 3 and 4 showed poor flocculating effects. Moreover, the proteins were isolated by protein electrophoresis and Laemmli assay. The biopolymers were applied to the textile fabric after dye bath. Biopolymer no.2 and 3 had good proteolytic activity and gave smoothness to the applied fabric. Biopolymer no. 1 and 4 gave not so much smoothness than the biopolymer no. 2 and 3.

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